Space Pioneers in Their Own Words
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Space Pioneers in Their Own Words
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Each month, a brief excerpt from a space pioneer's oral history will be featured on this page. This is the excerpt for August 2018:
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Each month, a brief excerpt from a space pioneer's oral history will be featured on this page. This is the excerpt for August 2018:
Jere (pronounced Jerry) Daily worked for Boeing as an industrial engineer on the Minuteman missile during the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. After his time on the Minuteman, he was sent to New Orleans, where he worked on the first stage of the Saturn V. About 1965, Daily went to work at Cape Canaveral.

I got down there before they fired the first Apollo. I did get to go out on the launch site, and I did get to go in the transporter crawler [that moved the launch vehicle from the assembly building to the launch pad] and see the effectiveness in that. That was very interesting, because they had to keep it level going out. They used water. They used pipes going underneath it, and they had water levels on each corner so the water would balance. It was simple, but it worked. The pathway out there is gravel. I think I remember it being 6 feet deep to absorb any change when the crawler would go out there.

When they first started Apollo, we lived in Titusville, about twelve miles away from the launch complex. We had had a swimming pool dug the day before they launched. The soil down there is very sandy, and there was a sump pump in the bottom of the area where they dug the pit. The water would seep in, and this sump pump would pump it out gradually. Well, when they launch the Apollo, it is latched down because it is liquid fuel, and it isn't released until it reaches full thrust. Well, the earth shakes. You can hear the rumble and feel the earth shake. In fact, we had some collectible plates on the wall in our kitchen, and we had actually taken those down. We were afraid they might fall. But the interesting and funny thing that happened was that the water came up so fast in the pool that the sump pump pumped it out and dug a six-foot furrow in our lawn.




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Cover of "Space Pioneers: In Their Own Words"
 Jere (pronounced Jerry) Daily worked for Boeing as an industrial engineer on the Minuteman missile during the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. After his time on the Minuteman, he was sent to New Orleans, where he worked on the first stage of the Saturn V. About 1965, Daily went to work at Cape Canaveral.

I got down there before they fired the first Apollo. I did get to go out on the launch site, and I did get to go in the transporter crawler [that moved the launch vehicle from the assembly building to the launch pad] and see the effectiveness in that. That was very interesting, because they had to keep it level going out. They used water. They used pipes going underneath it, and they had water levels on each corner so the water would balance. It was simple, but it worked. The pathway out there is gravel. I think I remember it being 6 feet deep to absorb any change when the crawler would go out there.

When they first started Apollo, we lived in Titusville, about twelve miles away from the launch complex. We had had a swimming pool dug the day before they launched. The soil down there is very sandy, and there was a sump pump in the bottom of the area where they dug the pit. The water would seep in, and this sump pump would pump it out gradually. Well, when they launch the Apollo, it is latched down because it is liquid fuel, and it isn't released until it reaches full thrust. Well, the earth shakes. You can hear the rumble and feel the earth shake. In fact, we had some collectible plates on the wall in our kitchen, and we had actually taken those down. We were afraid they might fall. But the interesting and funny thing that happened was that the water came up so fast in the pool that the sump pump pumped it out and dug a six-foot furrow in our lawn.
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